Scriptura

Its language largely forgotten we
(A) rely on professionals to remind us
of its lines or
(B) pine for the good old days which,
let’s face it, were not all that swell.
Maybe the will toward the words is
atavistic, sometimes skipping generations.
Maybe a people not yet born will
learn again to pronounce each morning’s
mercies new, and what the sorrow
sounds like that leads to repentance.
 
 
 
 
 

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7 Comments

  1. sethhaines on April 1, 2014 at 12:28 pm

    Let it be.

  2. Peg Richards on April 1, 2014 at 12:31 pm

    I love this: “Maybe a people not yet born will learn again to pronounce each morning’s mercies new, and what the sorrow sounds like that leads to repentance.” Beautiful words, John. Let’s hope and pray that a regeneration will create in all people a “will toward the words” when the time is ripe in their lives.

  3. patiricia on April 1, 2014 at 1:29 pm

    the sorrow sound… yes.

  4. jane r williams on April 1, 2014 at 1:43 pm

    … my spirit stands mesmerized.

  5. Susan Irene Fox on April 1, 2014 at 3:10 pm

    Blessed are those who are poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

  6. Bare Branches on April 2, 2014 at 3:19 am

    there’s always lots to love here. much profundity (HA! how do you like them apples?). sometimes it’s just a word. in this case “swell.” I love “swell.” It’s so 1950s. don’t know if the 50s were good days or bad days, but they brought us “swell,” which is a good thing.

  7. Michael Kates on April 2, 2014 at 11:19 am

    Thank you, and God bless you!

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